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Aaron Angell, photo Max Slaven

Aaron Angell, photo Max Slaven

Aaron Angell
Gallery One
December 8 2017 – March 18 2018

Leading British artist Aaron Angell presents a series of new works including ceramic sculpture, inflatables, painting, Victorian furniture and plant life to create an anachronistic interior, which mines various points in history and unusual hobbyist cultures to develop a large scale, immersive exhibition.

At the exhibition’s heart is Glasgow Museums’ notable and recently conserved Wardian case. This Victorian fern case will be displayed for the first time in over a quarter of a century. It was conserved especially for the exhibition and is to be fully planted with a range of ferns and mosses in a style reminiscent of its original display in the mid-nineteenth century. One of the very few surviving, original Wardian Cases, the piece was built a stone’s throw from GoMA and dates from around 1860. It is without doubt one of the finest ever made.

The centrepiece of this show is approximately the most Victorian object ever manufactured. It has it all. Fetishisation of the most stolid aspects of the classical world, the bondage of wildness and growth, even the concealed sexual organs of the ferns and mosses themselves. It is also, almost by mistake, a prototype for the radical biotopic architecture of the mid-20th century.

As an exhibition space without any proper walls, I was interested in contrasting the case with a treatment of the hall at GoMA as a basic exercise in open plan interior design. The cliché of the loft, the archipelago of stations, objects, and pools of light. This is much more a house for a couple than an exhibition of my work. Aaron Angell 2017

Alongside the case will be four new sculptures – a piece of inflatable furniture filled with a mock hypocaust heating system, a methane ‘sewer’ gas lamp, a cabbage and a cinerary urn. The lamp will feature the four pipe form that occurs throughout Angell’s recent work and a sconce modelled on a Roman coin. Ceramic works, made shortly after Angell’s recent residency at the Leach Pottery in St Ives, are based on the profile of Roman cineraria or cinerary urns intended for the remains of married couples. Having never visited Italy, the history of the Roman civilization remains “Literary and ridiculous” to Angell, a malleable idea rather than a historical fact.

In a continuation of the artist’s interest in problems of scale, hobbyist aesthetics and poetic thought, Angell will also display a giant flatpol cabbage, presented as a sculpture. Grown by expert giant vegetable grower Kevin Fortey the cabbage will be housed in a concrete artist-made planter. The cabbage, like the ferns and mosses, will continue to grow during the exhibition’s run, offering the idea of the exhibition as a living extension of Angell’s practice.

All of the works reference the complex history of GoMA’s site as a residence, garden, and neoclassical fancy. They continue Angell’s interest in marginal forms of image making and collapse the distinction between high and low art. The intentionally amateurish look of his sculptural work, for example, is offset by the in depth, nuanced and detailed histories that Angell mines for reference and by the difficulty of the ceramic process itself.

GoMA would like to thank the Friends of Glasgow Museums for supporting the conservation of the Wardian Case.

The artist and Glasgow Museums would like to thank Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Royal Botanical Gardens Edinburgh and Dr Mary Gibby for their assistance and advice in regards to the planting of the Wardian Case.

Aaron Angell (b. 1987, Kent) studied at the Slade School of Art and is the founder of Troy Town Art Pottery, a radical and psychedelic pottery for artists. He lives and works in London.

Upcoming solo exhibitions include: Koppe Astner, Glasgow, Art Exchange, Colchester, and Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany.

Recent exhibitions include Why I built the Cloaca Maxima (Rob Tufnell, London, 2017), That Continuous Thing: Artists and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – today (Tate St Ives, 2017), Variations on the Chaldon Doom (Markus Lüttgen, Cologne, 2017), The British Art Show 8 (Edinburgh, Leeds, Southampton, Norwich, 2017, Grotwork (Studio Voltaire, London, 2016), Woman expecting triplets returning home from the cinema (SWG3, Glasgow, 2012).

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Work from the Collection opened last Thursday evening and is an exhibition by the Glasgow-based artist Stephen Sutcliffe. Glasgow Museums purchased five works by Sutcliffe for the City’s collection in 2013 but this is the first time the wall drawing, photograph and films are being exhibited in the gallery. We are delighted that Sutcliffe has lent us two further works for inclusion in the show.

Sutcliffe’s work draws upon an extensive personal archive of broadcast material and printed ephemera that he has collected over a number of years. The appropriation and reimaging of original materials is present throughout Sutcliffe’s films, drawings and photographs.

In his wall drawings and photographs he has reworked cartoons by Saul Steinberg, whose work often featured in The New Yorker magazine. In his films, recordings from television, cinema and radio are edited together to make poetic new works that focus on anxiety and self-doubt. His careful editing of sound and image creates an awkwardness or interruption, which is often humorous at first glance, but can be read as quite dark and satirical, revealing an interest in the subversion of dominant narratives about communication, power and class.

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At the end of July 2017 the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) in Glasgow unveiled a permanent display on its two elliptical balcony spaces within the interior of the building. Stones Steeped in History tells the story of the building from before it was built in 1776 through its various uses and modifications up to its controversial opening as a gallery of contemporary and modern art in 1996.

The display describes that the original building belonged to William Cunninghame of Laishaw and that he was a millionaire merchant. We are explicit in detailing that his wealth trading American tobacco and Caribbean sugar relied on the exploitation of slave labour on plantations. The information on display also gives the further context of how Glasgow’s Georgian New Town in and around Cunninghame’s mansion developed as a business quarter. Again we detail that this new city grew through wealth acquired through slavery and selling addictive tobacco, sugar and alcohol.

GoMA welcomes around 600,000 visitors per year and is Scotland’s most visited modern art gallery. We feel it is important that we allow visitors access to information about the establishment of GoMA and what the beautiful neo-classical building was used for before. It has been a home, a bank, an exchange and a library before its current use as a gallery.

This new display allows us to tell the story of the building through times of great wealth from international trade – with undeniable links to slavery – to innovations such as one of the city’s first telephone exchanges and on to Glasgow’s rise as a centre for art and culture. The permanency of the display allows us to be transparent about this history all year round (not just for one-off events during the course of the year) and to treat and interpret the building as the beautiful architectural object that it is.

IMG_3090 2Marlie Mul
This exhibition is cancelled
26 May – 29 October

This would have been Marlie Mul’s first exhibition in Scotland, however after careful consideration the artist has cancelled the exhibition.

There is no exhibition.

Except for large billboard posters that advertised the exhibition’s cancellation, the gallery is empty.

While there is no exhibition, visitors are welcome to continue to use the gallery space. To discuss using Gallery 1 for you own activities please speak to a member of staff on site, or download a proposal form here This exhibition CANCELLED_ Public Proposal Form.

The exhibition is cancelled is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and The Mondriaan Fund.

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Installation shot of 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot of ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

As we enter the closing weeks of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, it is your last chance to see the exhibition and we are delighted to share details of the remaining public events in our exciting engagement programme.

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Wednesday 26th October 2016, 6.30 – 7.45pm GoMA
Jacqueline Donachie in conversation with Professor Tom Shakespeare

This event will examine the role of creative arts in exploring and understanding the challenges that disability and genetics pose to individuals and families.  In particular, the discussion will reference the passage of time that relates to Donachie’s exhibition, and the film Skin Horse (1983), currently in the John Samson exhibition in Gallery 1. Tom Shakespeare recently re-visited eight of the participants in his 1996 book, The Sexual Politics of Disability, who now feel that their disability has become less salient, more akin to the general effects of ageing seen in the wider population. Yet with degenerative conditions, the disability becomes more prominent in the individual’s own biography. Art and social research can both tell these stories, but art captures the imagination and enables reflection, in ways that academic work rarely does.

Tom Shakespeare is professor of disability research at UEA.  He has written extensively on disability rights and bioethics and is author of ‘Disability Rights and Wrongs’ and ‘Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome’ among other books and articles.  He was formerly a member of Arts Council England, and has curated three different science/ art exhibitions around the social and ethical impacts of the life sciences, as well as making work himself.

 

Installation shot of 'Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Installation shot of ‘Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

4 November 2016, Day Symposium
(10am – 4.30pm, Platform. Transport provided from Glasgow city centre).

This day symposium will provide an opportunity to discuss in depth some of the issues raised by Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain.

By taking the theme of expert culture and participation and examining this through a prism of ethics and academic practice, the symposium will look at lived experience as a model for radical practice to challenge social constructs around scientific and medical research, and knowledge exchange.  Can auto-ethnographic and participative art practice increase our understanding of disability and care in the fields of genetics, inherited disability and ageing? What is the role of lived experience within both creative practice and academic research, and how can the effects on participants be assessed, and valued?

Speakers come from a range of academic and artistic backgrounds, and each has been asked to address in some way the effects of their practice on specific communities of interest.

They include Jacqueline Donachie, Karen Guthrie, Jason E Bowman and Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley. The day will be chaired by Alison Stirling, with a narrative commentary provided by Moira Jeffrey.

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain: the symposium has been supported by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, The Marigold Foundation and Glasgow Life.

To book a ticket for the symposium please use this link: The Symposium https://platform-online.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873563814

Information in PDF format here final-events-pdf

Greetings from Lanesville (still), 1976

Greetings from Lanesville (still), 1976

 

Please Turn Us On
28 July 2016 – 22 January 2017
Arthur Ginsberg with Video Free America
Heather Phillipson
Stansfield/Hooykaas
Videofreex

Please Turn Us On places Glasgow at the centre of a dialogue between early video art and international counterculture. Stansfield/Hooykaas’ What’s It To You? is presented in direct conversation with three other projects that play on themes explored in this seminal, Glasgow-made work.

Elsa Stansfield (b. Glasgow, 1945, d. Amsterdam, 2004) and Madelon Hooykaas (b. Maartensdijk, 1942) worked at the genesis of time-based practice, with the pair quick to realise the potential of video as an art form and as a communication tool. Shown at Glasgow’s The Third Eye Centre for a week in 1975, What’s It To You? was the first installation of its kind ever to be seen in Glasgow. During its original showing the work combined recorded and live film with photography and text. It was truly an interactive work, with audience engagement at its very core. The public’s changing responses to being filmed and questioned gave the work a different meaning with each viewing.

Using a combination of media to offer multiple readings of the work became a staple throughout Stansfield/Hooykaas’ rich career. Keen not to have the authoritative voice within their work, rather they attempted to use new video tape technology to break down social hierarchies and democratise the act of looking at and making artworks. It was through these means that What’s It To You? put Glasgow in communication with other counterculture movements across the globe.

Similarly dynamic projects were taking place across America. In Greetings from Lanesville Videofreex brought their brand of guerrilla broadcasting to Upstate New York. Their Lanesville TV was the first localised, pirate television station in the world. It featured interviews with the rural community, audience phone-ins and dramatic news reports. Videofreex helped to create a portrait of the local community, made by the local community. This happened at a time of great social and political turmoil, when many people didn’t feel like their attitudes were being fairly represented by traditional media. Lanesville TV offered a much-needed alternative voice and paved the way for modern, user-generated broadcasting.

As Stansfield/Hooykaas and Videofreex worked with our shared public experiences, The Continuing Story of Carel and Ferd anticipated the camera’s ability to enter into the most personal parts of our lives. Between 1970 and 1972 director Arthur Ginsberg filmed the not-so-average daily lives of soon-to-be-wed Carel Rowe and Ferd Eggan. This precursor to reality television documents the couple’s changing desires and the drastic evolution of their relationship while living their lives in front of the camera. It is an early warning about the risks of living too close to an electronic medium.

Running through the exhibition is a new commission by London-based artist Heather Phillipson, bringing the issues raised by Stansfield/Hooykaas, Videofreex and Arthur Ginsberg into the contemporary. By focusing the historical elements of Please Turn Us On through her work, Phillipson suggests that despite the current ubiquitousness of personal filming equipment our understanding of its consequences hasn’t developed all that much in the last four decades.

Installation shot from 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot from Deep in the Heart of Your Brain (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain
Jacqueline Donachie
Gallery 4
20 May – 13 November 2016

Deep in the heart of your brain is a lever/ Deep in the heart of your brain is a switch
Radio Ethiopia, Patti Smith Band, Arista Records 1976

My conversation with Jacqueline Donachie began in 2011, when the gallery was examining questions around health, play and wellbeing. I was open to what the relationship with the artist might be, but interested in the development of her collaborations with scientists and how that informed her work in public spaces or the gallery setting. As our discussions developed it became apparent that there was an excellent opportunity to work with Donachie at the culmination of her PHD where she had spent considerable time reflecting on her practice in this medical and scientific realm, alongside realising ambitious new artworks. Our interest or ‘mutual curiosity’ we had about how artists and art institutions inform research and lead collaborations with medical academics and institutions inspired the thread that runs through the exhibition, the learning programme and the symposium. It is a curiosity that we hoped would engage visitors in the gallery and contribute to a current wider discourse on art and science.

Since 2002, Jacqueline Donachie has worked with a range of scientific and medical professionals in collaborative processes to produce new ideas and artworks. This significant solo show with GoMA, includes sculpture and drawings made in the last five years alongside new commissioned works developed from a period of research with a group of women affected by an inherited genetic condition, made in collaboration with the UK Myotonic Dystrophy Patient Registry at The John Walton Muscular Dystrophy Research Centre in Newcastle.

Installation shot of 'Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Installation shot of Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Central to the exhibition is the new film work Hazel, a powerful three screen installation that directly connects the experiences of the participants – all sister sets, where one sibling has inherited the myotonic dystrophy gene and one has not – to a wider discussion around relationships, age and appearance. Edited from interviews with the siblings, the film doesn’t seek to present a literal case study representing an unknown research question. Instead Donachie asserts the role of artist in the editing the work. The unaffected sister is silent. The women talking discuss different aspects of their lived experiences with myotonic dystrophy. The viewer is drawn into a space where they encounter and listen to these edited interviews, but have more questions provoked than answers provided. Hazel is a portrait, not just of the women portrayed, but also of a wider lived experience we can all relate to through our own experiences of ageing, care and loss.

Artists working with their own lived experiences and relationships in their work is not unusual. Glasgow Museums has significant holdings of work in the collection by Jo Spence, who documented and commented on her relationships with her mother, her own body and experience of breast cancer through her photographs. However, while Donachie is present in her work (Studio 1995 and Pose Work for Sisters) she is also chooses not make herself the subject of the exhibition. The portraits she alludes to in her work are seen in relationship to the urban environment we inhabit and observations of materials and structures we use to navigate that space. Human scale is played with in the drawings (Glimmer I –V) and sculptures (Winter Trees and Headphones, Music, Boats and Trains). The selection of lampposts and streetlights for the drawings is an observation on the urban, everyday object’s elegance and relationship to the human body. They are tall and elegant, echoing the portraits in Studio 1995, where Donachie was posing and photographing herself against a white background (these works were shown photocopied and on billboards). But they equally have kinks and bends which could be a ‘neck not able to hold up or a back trying to straighten’ *. The Glimmer series of drawings and their pose are reflected in the Winter Trees sculpture series, which similarly examine the urban, our human relationship to it and the pose.

The sculptures, stark in their choice of materials: industrial, practical and immovable, have very emotive and poetic titles playing on boundaries between the external public experience and the often internal lived experiences. The Winter Trees title is taken from a Sylvia Plath poem alluding to moments of care when you are awake outside of your normal routine hours and start to see the landscape and environment around you in different ways. Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever as a title is taken from the lyrics of a Patti Smith song and refers to moments of feeling trapped by life and motherhood, a sentiment reflected in the scale, slick black finish and immovable nature of the sculpture.

For me the reflection on public [urban/industrial] and private [domestic/poetic] runs through Donachie’s work: whether in the materials she uses (scaffolding, aluminium plates, washing lines, repurposed clothing and threads) or the research (scientific findings, published research and personal testimonies). The use of materials and her research are distilled through a particular curiosity in how to present this as artworks in different contexts (parks, streets and galleries). Her railings sculptures have one presence in the public environment, where they are competing with everything around them, which shifts when Nice Style is isolated in the gallery.

Installation shot from 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot from Deep in the Heart of Your Brain (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is at first glance a stark, confident and monochromatic show interrupted by a drawn orange gesture leading, or diverting you, through the space. But spend some time there and viewed through the prism of the works Hazel, Studio 1995 and Pose Work for Sisters it reveals poetic reflections on playfulness, relationships, care and lived experience – when that lever must be applied.

Katie Bruce
Producer Curator, GoMA

* Interview with the artist May 2016

The ambition of Deep in the Heart of Your Brain benefited from significant funding awarded by the Wellcome Trust in mid July 2015. Further support from Creative Scotland for Donachie has given her the scope to pursue research into the body of work she has developed over the last 15 years and Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is an opportunity to engage that research and practice with a wider audience. We are currently finalising plans for a symposium at PLATFORM on 4 November 2016 and looking forward to a series of workshops, events and talks, including one with Professor Tom Shakespeare on 28 October in Glasgow.

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain was reviewed by Moira Jeffrey (Scotland on Sunday), Laura Campbell (The List) and see the BBC interview (19 May 2016) here.

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