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Aaron Angell, photo Max Slaven

Aaron Angell, photo Max Slaven

Aaron Angell
Gallery One
December 8 2017 – March 18 2018

Leading British artist Aaron Angell presents a series of new works including ceramic sculpture, inflatables, painting, Victorian furniture and plant life to create an anachronistic interior, which mines various points in history and unusual hobbyist cultures to develop a large scale, immersive exhibition.

At the exhibition’s heart is Glasgow Museums’ notable and recently conserved Wardian case. This Victorian fern case will be displayed for the first time in over a quarter of a century. It was conserved especially for the exhibition and is to be fully planted with a range of ferns and mosses in a style reminiscent of its original display in the mid-nineteenth century. One of the very few surviving, original Wardian Cases, the piece was built a stone’s throw from GoMA and dates from around 1860. It is without doubt one of the finest ever made.

The centrepiece of this show is approximately the most Victorian object ever manufactured. It has it all. Fetishisation of the most stolid aspects of the classical world, the bondage of wildness and growth, even the concealed sexual organs of the ferns and mosses themselves. It is also, almost by mistake, a prototype for the radical biotopic architecture of the mid-20th century.

As an exhibition space without any proper walls, I was interested in contrasting the case with a treatment of the hall at GoMA as a basic exercise in open plan interior design. The cliché of the loft, the archipelago of stations, objects, and pools of light. This is much more a house for a couple than an exhibition of my work. Aaron Angell 2017

Alongside the case will be four new sculptures – a piece of inflatable furniture filled with a mock hypocaust heating system, a methane ‘sewer’ gas lamp, a cabbage and a cinerary urn. The lamp will feature the four pipe form that occurs throughout Angell’s recent work and a sconce modelled on a Roman coin. Ceramic works, made shortly after Angell’s recent residency at the Leach Pottery in St Ives, are based on the profile of Roman cineraria or cinerary urns intended for the remains of married couples. Having never visited Italy, the history of the Roman civilization remains “Literary and ridiculous” to Angell, a malleable idea rather than a historical fact.

In a continuation of the artist’s interest in problems of scale, hobbyist aesthetics and poetic thought, Angell will also display a giant flatpol cabbage, presented as a sculpture. Grown by expert giant vegetable grower Kevin Fortey the cabbage will be housed in a concrete artist-made planter. The cabbage, like the ferns and mosses, will continue to grow during the exhibition’s run, offering the idea of the exhibition as a living extension of Angell’s practice.

All of the works reference the complex history of GoMA’s site as a residence, garden, and neoclassical fancy. They continue Angell’s interest in marginal forms of image making and collapse the distinction between high and low art. The intentionally amateurish look of his sculptural work, for example, is offset by the in depth, nuanced and detailed histories that Angell mines for reference and by the difficulty of the ceramic process itself.

GoMA would like to thank the Friends of Glasgow Museums for supporting the conservation of the Wardian Case.

The artist and Glasgow Museums would like to thank Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Royal Botanical Gardens Edinburgh and Dr Mary Gibby for their assistance and advice in regards to the planting of the Wardian Case.

Aaron Angell (b. 1987, Kent) studied at the Slade School of Art and is the founder of Troy Town Art Pottery, a radical and psychedelic pottery for artists. He lives and works in London.

Upcoming solo exhibitions include: Koppe Astner, Glasgow, Art Exchange, Colchester, and Kunstverein Freiburg, Germany.

Recent exhibitions include Why I built the Cloaca Maxima (Rob Tufnell, London, 2017), That Continuous Thing: Artists and the Ceramics Studio, 1920 – today (Tate St Ives, 2017), Variations on the Chaldon Doom (Markus Lüttgen, Cologne, 2017), The British Art Show 8 (Edinburgh, Leeds, Southampton, Norwich, 2017, Grotwork (Studio Voltaire, London, 2016), Woman expecting triplets returning home from the cinema (SWG3, Glasgow, 2012).

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TASTE!

TASTE!

TASTE

Gallery 2
From 14 July 2017
Henri Cartier-Bresson, Beryl Cook, Fischli/Weiss, Sarah Forrest, Andy Goldsworthy, Douglas Gordon, David Hockney, Eduardo Paolozzi, David Shrigley, Stanley Spencer, Andy Warhol and Lawrence Weiner
TASTE! * is an exhibition of artworks from Glasgow Museums’ collection displayed alongside material from our archive, exploring how collections are built, artworks are commissioned, and exhibitions are organised. Through the display of artwork and archive, TASTE! will present a narrative that unpicks the history of the Gallery of Modern Art’s (GoMA) collecting, shining a light on both the artworks and the processes behind their journey from artist’s studio to museum collection. By hanging artwork and archive together, TASTE! suggests that object and idea are of equal importance and offers the exhibition as a space to enjoy, question and discuss the value of art.

Few things can cause controversy in the way that contemporary art can. From unmade beds to piles of bricks, the objects, processes and concepts behind modern and contemporary art are undoubtedly challenging. Since opening its doors in 1996, GoMA has, like the work its shown, sometimes been a controversial place. Once notorious for not including artists emerging from Glasgow in the early to mid-90s in favour of popular, figurative artworks, much of what has been shown here has divided opinion.  Now GoMA can pride itself on being a forward thinking, progressive collecting institution with one of the strongest and most diverse collections of Contemporary Art in the UK, holding a wide range of works from cutting edge performance art to internationally significant photography and video.

TASTE! aims to show how curators have approached collecting over the last two decades, exploring artists and curators methods, reasoning and influences.
Showing works in a new and experimental context will invoke the spirit in which many artworks were made. Trying new methods of work is key part of both artistic and museological practice and by showing some different combinations of artworks and never before seen objects from the archive**, GoMA is trying something new – attempting to offer a unique insight into contemporary art for both experienced museum goers and first time visitors alike.
Much of the thought processes that take place inside artist’s studios and the offices of the world’s art galleries are completely invisible and alien to many. I think partly because of this it can be a challenge for some visitors when they’re confronted with an unmade bed or pile of bricks and told it’s a work of art. By showing artworks and documents from our archive we hope to offer a greater insight into the how’s and whys of what goes on at GoMA.Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Will Cooper

*With works by 12 artists including Andy Warhol, Beryl Cook, Douglas Gordon, Sarah Forrest and Eduardo Paolozzi, TASTE! will periodically change with rotations taking placing over the coming years.

**This exhibition will, for the first time, place works together to create a snapshot of our collecting history, with some never before seen archive material expanding on GoMA’s rich history.

Installation shot from 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot from ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

This time last year Deep in the Heart of Your Brain* had been open for a couple of weeks and the excellent reviews for the exhibition had started come in. Roll on one year and the artist Jacqueline Donachie, along with the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh, has won the inaugural Freelands Award and is currently making new work for the exhibition in Edinburgh later this year; Glasgow Museums now has a capsule collection of her works acquired for the City with the support of the National Fund for Acquisitions; over 40,000 visitors attended the exhibition; and 2105 people attended 52 events, talks and workshops as part of the public programme.

The Deep in the Heart of Your Brain symposium** was a significant aspect of the public programme. It was exciting to programme in response to the exhibition and be a part of the amazing discussions that happened that day. We were delighted when Moira Jeffrey agreed to write a response to the symposium and are now even more delighted to be able to publish it online here. Field Notes from the Heart’s Frontier.

GoMA are very grateful to Moira for her wonderfully considered response to the day and her enthusiasm for taking on a very open brief! We would also like to thank Jacqueline Donachie for feedback, Angelo Nese for copy editing and Kirsty McBride for a fantastic job on the design.

*Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, 20 May–13 November 2016, Gallery 4, Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), Glasgow, the symposium and Field Notes from the Heart’s Frontier  were commissioned by Glasgow Museums with support from a Wellcome Trust Arts Award. Jacqueline Donachie also re-ceived support to work with GoMA from the National Lottery through the Creative Scotland Open Project Fund.

**The Deep in the Heart of Your Brain symposium was held at Platform, Glasgow on November 4, 2016, to develop the themes of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition of the same name at the Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow. The symposium was co-produced by Katie Bruce and Jacqueline Donachie and chaired by Alison Stirling, Projects Director, Artlink, Edinburgh. Its aims were to bring artists, institutions, academics and interested individuals together to dis-cuss care, bravery, lived experience, autoethnography and expert cultures in relation to the ethics and practice of knowledge exchange/public engagement in the art/medical research field.

The contributions were:
Jacqueline Donachie, Artist. Illuminating Loss
Karen Guthrie, Artist and filmmaker. The Closer We Get
Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Professor of Medical and Family Sociology, Assistant Principal, Research-led learning and Dean of Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences in the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh. Making the private public: lived experience of health and illness.
Jason E. Bowman, Artist with a curatorial practice, writer, researcher and educator. MFA: Fine Art Programme Leader at the Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg. Curating as Care Making

IMG_3090 2Marlie Mul
This exhibition is cancelled
26 May – 29 October

This would have been Marlie Mul’s first exhibition in Scotland, however after careful consideration the artist has cancelled the exhibition.

There is no exhibition.

Except for large billboard posters that advertised the exhibition’s cancellation, the gallery is empty.

While there is no exhibition, visitors are welcome to continue to use the gallery space. To discuss using Gallery 1 for you own activities please speak to a member of staff on site, or download a proposal form here This exhibition CANCELLED_ Public Proposal Form.

The exhibition is cancelled is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and The Mondriaan Fund.

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image part II rotator

Please Turn Us On Pt II
Gallery 3
8th April – 31st May 2017

Carole Roussopoulos
Heather Phillipson
Stansfield/Hooykaas
Susan Mogul

Please Turn Us On pt II continues the dialogue between early video art and international countercultures. Stansfield/Hooykaas’ What’s It To You (1975) and Heather Phillipson’s You Can Use Your Smartphone (2014) remain from Please Turn Us On pt I and are accompanied by two works exploring video technology’s importance to radical feminist groups in the early 1970s.

What’s It To You? is a pioneering work by artist duo Elsa Stansfield and Madelon Hooykaas. Made in Glasgow, using the Third Eye Centre’s video equipment, What’s It To You? allowed the local community to directly respond to this groundbreaking technology.

Original photographs and archive materials from the project offer insight into artists’ approach to early video. Alongside are two politically engaged and unconventional films whose relevance in the political climate of 2017 should not be underestimated.

Carole Roussopoulos’s Le F.H.A.R. (1971) and Susan Mogul’s Feminist Studio Workshop Videoletter (1975) explore how important social and political groups grabbed hold of video tech to capture, chronicle and share their message.

The commission by British artist Heather Phillipson questions the place of countercultures in the 21st century and how the normalisation of video recording has affected the contemporary society.

swipe-right

We are very grateful to GoMA’s current students, Angelo and Dimitra, on their internship as part of the MSc: Modern and Contemporary Art: History, Curating and Criticism at the Univeristy of Edinburgh, for developing their upcoming event: Swipe Right. Swipe Right is part of the GpMA’s Public Programme engaging diverse audiences in the current exhibition programme specifically around two exhibitions Please Turn Us On and Polygraphs

TICKET LINK https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/swipe-right-tickets-32228553471

VENUE & TIME:
4.45 – 7.45pm
Gallery 4

INFORMATION

Swipe Right is a performative and discursive event with engaging talks, illustrated poetry and comedienne Clare Summerskill will be presenting her stand-up and comedy songs. The event opens up a discussion around LGBT+ identity and self-image after the Web 2.0.

The proliferation of online dating applications and social platforms has brought a change in the way people perceive themselves and construct their own image. Specifically, the image of LGBT+ people changed across the years, building an identity over old and new stereotypes that seemed to become gradually different from the 1970s and partially less politically involved. In an open dialogue with the history, culture and political struggle of the gay liberation movement since the 1960s, this event attempts to explore the development of the self-image of the individuals through mainstream and new media (TV, cinema, video, social network, dating applications) as well as through various forms of visual culture (illustrated poetry, visual art, performance) in the last four decades.

Swipe Right with contributions from:

Dr Michael Bachmann, Theatre Studies, University of Glasgow

Dr Lucy Weir, Modern and Contemporary Art, University of Edinburgh

Professor David Kinloch, Poetry and Creative Writing, University of Strathclyde

Clare Summerskill, Comedienne, actress, writer, singer

Programme:

4.45pm-6.30pm Talks and Q&A

7pm – 7.45pm Clare Summerskill performance

Refreshments

Installation shot of 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot of ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

As we enter the closing weeks of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, it is your last chance to see the exhibition and we are delighted to share details of the remaining public events in our exciting engagement programme.

tom-shakespeare-publication-in-john-samson-1978-83

Wednesday 26th October 2016, 6.30 – 7.45pm GoMA
Jacqueline Donachie in conversation with Professor Tom Shakespeare

This event will examine the role of creative arts in exploring and understanding the challenges that disability and genetics pose to individuals and families.  In particular, the discussion will reference the passage of time that relates to Donachie’s exhibition, and the film Skin Horse (1983), currently in the John Samson exhibition in Gallery 1. Tom Shakespeare recently re-visited eight of the participants in his 1996 book, The Sexual Politics of Disability, who now feel that their disability has become less salient, more akin to the general effects of ageing seen in the wider population. Yet with degenerative conditions, the disability becomes more prominent in the individual’s own biography. Art and social research can both tell these stories, but art captures the imagination and enables reflection, in ways that academic work rarely does.

Tom Shakespeare is professor of disability research at UEA.  He has written extensively on disability rights and bioethics and is author of ‘Disability Rights and Wrongs’ and ‘Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome’ among other books and articles.  He was formerly a member of Arts Council England, and has curated three different science/ art exhibitions around the social and ethical impacts of the life sciences, as well as making work himself.

 

Installation shot of 'Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Installation shot of ‘Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

4 November 2016, Day Symposium
(10am – 4.30pm, Platform. Transport provided from Glasgow city centre).

This day symposium will provide an opportunity to discuss in depth some of the issues raised by Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain.

By taking the theme of expert culture and participation and examining this through a prism of ethics and academic practice, the symposium will look at lived experience as a model for radical practice to challenge social constructs around scientific and medical research, and knowledge exchange.  Can auto-ethnographic and participative art practice increase our understanding of disability and care in the fields of genetics, inherited disability and ageing? What is the role of lived experience within both creative practice and academic research, and how can the effects on participants be assessed, and valued?

Speakers come from a range of academic and artistic backgrounds, and each has been asked to address in some way the effects of their practice on specific communities of interest.

They include Jacqueline Donachie, Karen Guthrie, Jason E Bowman and Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley. The day will be chaired by Alison Stirling, with a narrative commentary provided by Moira Jeffrey.

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain: the symposium has been supported by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, The Marigold Foundation and Glasgow Life.

To book a ticket for the symposium please use this link: The Symposium https://platform-online.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873563814

Information in PDF format here final-events-pdf

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