Archive

Glasgow

Lauren Gault 'Granular and Crumb' 2015, courtesy and copyright the artist

Lauren Gault ‘Granular and Crumb’ 2015, courtesy and copyright the artist

Modern Edinburgh Film School presents

Lauren Gault: Granular & Crumb

Saturday 5 September 2015
4 – 6 pm
Glasgow Sculpture Studios Gallery (PLEASE NOTE that the event is not at GoMA)

For Ripples on the Pond Lauren Gault will present a special event at Glasgow Sculpture Studios encompassing an extended version of her film Granular & Crumb, while reflecting on her recent exhibitions Plosive Blows at Hotel Maria Kapel, Hoorn, The Netherlands and fugue states at the CCA, Glasgow.

Lauren Gault comes to film as a ‘fragment’ in a predominantly sculpture-based practice that is marked for its concerns with material and lived experiences. She works with the behaviours and conditions of matter aligned to specific processes: preservation and extreme lengths of time, dispersion of fine particles in liquid, terroir, phosphorescence, transparency and in-between malleable and solid states. Objects that are carriers of complex histories and narratives, substances and her ceramics are placed in carefully constructed installations, while the inclusion of moving image and performance in these presentations make film and sculpture mutable encounters.

Ripples on the Pond is an exhibition which has at its core works from the Glasgow Museums’ Collection. It takes as the starting point recent acquisitions from Glasgow Women’s Library’s 21 Revolutions series, relating them to other works in the collection and sparking questions about gender, themes and media choice in relation to women’s practice and visibility. The exhibition is a conversation between the works in the collection on paper and moving image with invitations to Modern Edinburgh Film School and LUX Scotland to programme artists’ screenings, within and beyond the gallery space.

Ripples on the Pond has been developed with Affiliate: Thinking Collections (a University of Glasgow programme funded by Creative Scotland) and Modern Edinburgh Film School, along with LUX Scotland and Glasgow Women’s Library. The programme with Lauren Gault is generously supported by Glasgow City Council’s Visual Art Award.

Still from 'LOVE' (2013) Mairi Lafferty

Still from ‘LOVE’ (2013) Mairi Lafferty

Modern Edinburgh Film School presents:
Mairi Lafferty
Thu 17 September 2015

At CCA Glasgow (PLEASE NOTE this  event is not at GoMA)
5pm, Free but ticketed, Theatre
All ages
Book online / 0141 352 4900

Modern Edinburgh Film School presents a double-screen installation and discussion on the video, performance and drawing practice of Edinburgh-based artist Mairi Lafferty and will reflect on her recent residency to make a new black and white 16mm film Droste at no.w.here in London. This event, which includes the guest speakers Dr Glyn Davis from Edinburgh College of Art and visual artist Suzanne van der Lingen discussing her relationship to cinema and fiction, forms a part of the exhibition Ripples on the Pond and its sister-essay A Poetic Measurement, designed as a conversation between works on paper and moving image by women artists.

‘Her work is about lived experiences, the subconscious, catharsis and change alongside a study in cinema techniques particularly from the films of Stanley Kubrick and Peter Greenaway immerses Lafferty’s work in the mind’s, and cinema’s, intangibility. Her work discusses the physics of dreams offering an aperture into the subconscious and the world’s inability to sustain dreaming’s haphazard materiality and dispersed timescales. Their properties are hypnotic, dangerous and unpredictable.’

Ripples on the Pond is an exhibition which has at its core works from the Glasgow Museums’ Collection. It takes as the starting point recent acquisitions from Glasgow Women’s Library’s 21 Revolutions series, relating them to other works in the collection and sparking questions about gender, themes and media choice in relation to women’s practice and visibility. The exhibition is a conversation between the works in the collection on paper and moving image with invitations to Modern Edinburgh Film School and LUX Scotland to programme artists’ screenings, within and beyond the gallery space.

Suzanne van der Lingen explores themes of repetition, authenticity and mortality in ‘How to Fake Your Own Death’ through the use of autobiographical fiction and footnotes. Originally published as an essay, the text has evolved into a video work, making narrative use of disjointed parallels between voice-over, image and onscreen titles.

Suzanne van der Lingen is an artist and writer based in Edinburgh. Her work has been exhibited at the Joinery, Dublin; the Fleming Collection, London; and Timespan Museum & Arts Centre, Sutherland, amongst others. She has been published in numerous publications including Paper Visual Art, GUP Magazine, Circa, MAP and Occupy Paper, and curated a screening of artist moving image for MAP at Glasgow Film Festival 2015. She was the recipient of the ECA/ESW Graduate Bursary Award 2014, and joined the Embassy Gallery committee in January 2015.

Glyn Davis is Chancellor’s Fellow and Reader in the School of Design, Edinburgh College of Art, at the University of Edinburgh. He is the co-editor, with Gary Needham, of ‘Warhol in Ten Takes’ (BFI, 2013), and the co-author, with Kay Dickinson, Lisa Patti, and Amy Villarejo, of ‘Film Studies: A Global Introduction’ (Routledge, 2015). He is currently writing a book on boredom and cinema. Glyn runs a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on the life and career of Andy Warhol, which remains the most successful online arts course in the world.

 Still from Broadcast Rites (2015) (digital video). Funded by Creative Scotland. Screening as part of The Death of Lady Mondegreen, a solo exhibition at The Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow. June 19th - September 20th 2015

Still from Broadcast Rites (2015) (digital video). Funded by Creative Scotland. Screening as part of The Death of Lady Mondegreen, a solo exhibition at The Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow. June 19th – September 20th 2015

The Death of Lady Mondegreen
Douglas Morland
19 June–20 September 2015*
Gallery 3

*Due to essential building maintenance, we have had to close Gallery 3 at GoMA to the public. As a result, Douglas Morland’s ‘The Death of Lady Mondegreen’, exhibition has closed sooner than planned . We are very sorry for any disappointment caused. We were delighted to show this incredible work and look forward to working with Douglas again in the future.

This solo exhibition by the Glasgow based artist Douglas Morland opened in June and we have had some great feedback about the work in the comments book. We are delighted that the artist will also be running the Adult Art club on Sunday 23 August and more info on that and how to book is here.

The exhibition’s title references a 1954 essay by Sylvia Wright in Harper’s Magazine in which she coined the term ‘mondegreen’, the mishearing or misinterpretation of a phrase in a song or poem in a way that gives rise to a new meaning. Wright recalled the deep effect made on her as a child by hearing one particular verse of the Scots ballad, The Bonnie Earl o’ Moray:

Ye Hielands an ye Lowlands, o, whaur hae ye been
They hae slain the Earl o’ Moray and lain him on the green.

She misheard the final line as ‘they have slain the Earl o’ Moray, and Lady Mondegreen’, and proceeded to imagine the most vivid scene of tragedy and loss:

‘I saw it all clearly. The Earl … was lying in a forest clearing with an arrow in his heart. Lady Mondegreen lay at his side. She wore a dark green dress embroidered with light green leaves outlined in gold. It had a low neck trimmed with lace. An arrow had pierced her throat: from it blood trickled over the lace. Sunlight coming through the leaves made dappled shadows on her cheeks and her closed eyelids. She was holding the Earl’s hand’

The fictive space that Wright’s mishearing opened was snapped shut years later upon hearing the line as it really is – her vivid depiction only ever having existed in an imaginary realm.

Morland’s exhibition takes this idea of mishearing or mistranslation as a starting point to create an assemblage of works that tease at creating echoes and suggestions of form and meaning. Utilising a variety of forms, motifs, textures and processes that have appeared previously in his practice and through a process of composition, veiling and revealing, a fictive space is suggested – the stage-like space where the dramatic tussle of language to form or discern meaning takes place.

The materials and processes at play in the first two rooms stress the artist’s interest in the physicality of information. Both the delicate, ‘barely there’ toner prints on paper and the large, crude, black casts of concrete objects, themselves originating from flat typographic sources, function as shadows, traces or phantoms and imply a journey from source to copy where something may inevitably be lost, gained or redefined along the way.

The use of fine ink-dipped translucent fabric, cut, stretched, bunched or hanging loose and curtainlike, similarly invites the viewer to think about physical weight and presence. A game of conceal and reveal takes place, with the seductive marbling of the ink pattern vying with the moiré patterns that arise from the layering of the fabric’s mesh. These notes of sensuality and theatrical artifice are perhaps nods to the fictitious Lady of the title, or could simply be an acknowledgement of the role aesthetics plays in systems of communication.

While the installation is dominated by concerns for shape, form and texture, the imagery found in the printed paper work appears like a set of cryptic clues, depicting objects that can be transformed from their original function. Morland also suggests rhythmic or structural similarities between the construction and delivery of verse and of the sculptural assemblages and wall work. Echoes and repetition of forms throughout the exhibition spaces imply a movement through time as well as space.

Similarly, Morland’s film, Broadcast Rites, which plays in the third room, deals with issues to do with the transmission, reception and physicality of information as well as its modes of presentation. Disjunctures in time and space are revealed by references to a ‘break’ or ‘cut’ throughout – also a reference to the most basic cinematic device, the cut of the editor. The film’s two characters – a mid- 20th-century broadcast announcer and an ancient Greek slave messenger who appears intermittently and ghost-like – seem completely incongruous in the same space and time.

However, as the announcer slips in and out of his role and the pace becomes more and more dreamlike, a connecting thread becomes apparent between the two. The film’s soundtrack is a key structural device and, like the work in the first two rooms (where motifs and forms from the film are obliquely echoed), beats out a kind of metered journey of encounter.

Douglas Morland (b.1974) is a Glasgow-based artist and musician. He studied Drawing and Painting then attended the Master of Fine Art programme at The Glasgow School of Art. He has exhibited extensively, in the UK and internationally.

Phil Collins, Tomorrow Is Always Too Long, 2014. Installation view, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, 2015. Photo: Alan Dimmick

Phil Collins, Tomorrow Is Always Too Long, 2014. Installation view, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, 2015. Photo: Alan Dimmick

Tomorrow is Always Too Long (2104) by Phil Collins opened on 9 July and is the final chapter in the Moving Image Season at GoMA since April 2015. GoMA would like to thank the artist, The Common Guild: Katrina Brown and Kitty Anderson; Sue MacDiarmid, Ivana Kličković and Siniša Mitrović for all their support to realise the work in Gallery 1 and we are looking forward to the Artist’s Talk with Phil Collins on Sunday 9 August. Screening times and information for Tomorrow is Always Too Long is available here.

You can also read brilliant interviews with Phil Collins on the film in an online version of the artilce printed in July/August 2015 issue of Modern Painters and the Q&A in a.n

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tomorrow Is Always Too Long, 2014 Phil Collins
10 July –16 August 2015
HD video, Hi8 and VHS; colour and black-and-white, sound; 82 minutes Courtesy Shady Lane Productions, Berlin
Audio-visual installation: Sue MacDiarmid

Tomorrow Is Always Too Long, a new film by Phil Collins, is a love letter to Glasgow, Scotland’s largest city. Commissioned by The Common Guild for Festival 2014, it was developed over the course of a year with various local communities and paints an idiosyncratic portrait of a place as seen through the scope of human experience, from birth and childhood through education and the criminal justice system to old age.

At the heart of the film is a six-song cycle by musician Cate Le Bon. Le Bon’s skewed and intimate pop gems are interpreted by non-professional singers, ranging from a 10-year old girl to an 83-year old man. Accompanied by the Royal Scottish National Orchestra and filmed in their everyday environments, including an antenatal class, a high school, HM Prison Barlinnie, and a social club for the elderly, the performances play out as kaleidoscopic vignettes in a larger modern day city symphony.

Musical sequences, shot by acclaimed cinematographer Michael McDonough, are interspersed with public-access style broadcasts filmed in 1960s’ college TV studio. They star a cast of Glaswegians from every walk of life whom Collins met and befriended: socially engaged pensioners, burlesque animal rights activists, street poets, market traders, Elvis impersonators, club kids, and elderly star-crossed lovers.

The third strand comprises a series of intricate short animations, created by Matthew Robins and soundtracked by Barry Burns, which follow a group of characters duringa night out on the town. A new element, presented for the first time in this exhibition, is a track by Golden Teacher, local voodoo-rave sensations, filmed at Langside Hall and shrouded in mystery up until now.

‘Music was always going to be an essential part of any film about Glasgow. It’s one of those cities where music seems to run in the water, like Manchester or Berlin – turn on a tap and it sings,’ says Collins. ‘For me, there’s an undeniable transformative power in a pop song, an ability to tilt even the most mundane situation into the realm of the extraordinary and of heartbreak. It’s a form of artifice in some ways more authentic than “real” emotion. So I wanted to imagine the real through the frame of music, and make something where song emerges from a living, breathing, working space. If the film can be described to function as an update on the idea of a city symphony, it does very literally so, though the voices of its inhabitants.’

The improbable lovechild of musicals and documentary, late-night television and silhouette animation, Tomorrow Is Always Too Long defies classification and embarks on an immersive, hypnotic trip into the heart of the city.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

January is an exciting month if you like contemporary painting!

GoMA is teaming up with Glasgow School of Art for three events around the painting exhibition currently on in GoMA, A Picture Show, and they are all FREE you just have to book a place.

First up is a symposium hosted across both venues on Tuesday the 21st of January. The backdrop of this symposium is A Picture Show but the day will focus on wider issues within contemporary painting with key note speakers; artist Melissa Gordon and artist & curator at Norway’s National Gallery Gavin Jantjes. The day will start at GoMA in the morning and finish in the Mackintosh Lecture theatre in Glasgow School of Art in the afternoon. With a keynote speaker and panel discussion we hope the day will be engaging, challenging and thought provoking. A must for anyone with an interest in painting today.

 Book through Eventbrite via this link:

 http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/painting-symposium-with-key-note-speakers-gavin-jantjes-melissa-gordon-tickets-10081077775

The other two events are informal conversation events by the artists in A Picture Show.

The first one on Thursday the 23rd of January at 6pm will see Merlin James, Hanneline Visnes & Charlie Hammond in conversation. Talking about their work in Gallery 2 the artist will walk around the exhibition discussing their work, the show and the wider context of contemporary painting.

The second event will take place on Thursday the 30th of January at 6pm and will consist of Neil Clements, George Ziffo & Andrew Kerr in conversation. The events will run 6pm – 7:30pm.

 Thursday 23rd of January event

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-picture-show-in-conversation-with-tickets-9906518664

 Thursday the 30th of January

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-picture-show-in-conversation-with-part-2-tickets-9907684150

Here’s a link to a full tour of A Picture Show by curator Sean McGlashan

https://vimeo.com/78216354

Looking forward to seeing you all there!

Join us every Sunday for a range of adult activities from hands on creative sessions to walking tours leaving from GoMA. Here is what is on for January: 

Sunday 5 January – Collage Posters

Taking inspiration from the Living with War show create a photographic collage. The work of Kennard and Phillips will form the basis for the artwork.

Sunday 12 January – Drawing Techniques

In this experimental drawing class we will explore the use of charcoal. No experience is necessary and all materials will be provided.

Sunday 19 January – Printing Techniques

Using a professional printing press, try out the ‘intaglio’ printing technique of drypoint. This is made by scratching a drawing onto a metal plate, coating with ink and rolled through the press. The results are very effective. Full instruction will be given – no experience necessary.

Sunday 26 January – History of GoMA

Come along and find out about the fascinating history of GoMA. Although it is a gallery of contemporary art the building is over 200 years old! A behind the scenes tour will reveal many interesting stories as well a screening of archive footage.

 

The Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow
Sundays 1.00pm – 3.00pm
Free (numbers may be limited)
0141 287 3050

%d bloggers like this: