Archive

Gallery of Modern Art

IMG_3090 2Marlie Mul
This exhibition is cancelled
26 May – 29 October

This would have been Marlie Mul’s first exhibition in Scotland, however after careful consideration the artist has cancelled the exhibition.

There is no exhibition.

Except for large billboard posters that advertised the exhibition’s cancellation, the gallery is empty.

While there is no exhibition, visitors are welcome to continue to use the gallery space. To discuss using Gallery 1 for you own activities please speak to a member of staff on site, or download a proposal form here This exhibition CANCELLED_ Public Proposal Form.

The exhibition is cancelled is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and The Mondriaan Fund.

hmf_partner_mono         Logo downloads EN web zwart

image part II rotator

Please Turn Us On Pt II
Gallery 3
8th April – 31st May 2017

Carole Roussopoulos
Heather Phillipson
Stansfield/Hooykaas
Susan Mogul

Please Turn Us On pt II continues the dialogue between early video art and international countercultures. Stansfield/Hooykaas’ What’s It To You (1975) and Heather Phillipson’s You Can Use Your Smartphone (2014) remain from Please Turn Us On pt I and are accompanied by two works exploring video technology’s importance to radical feminist groups in the early 1970s.

What’s It To You? is a pioneering work by artist duo Elsa Stansfield and Madelon Hooykaas. Made in Glasgow, using the Third Eye Centre’s video equipment, What’s It To You? allowed the local community to directly respond to this groundbreaking technology.

Original photographs and archive materials from the project offer insight into artists’ approach to early video. Alongside are two politically engaged and unconventional films whose relevance in the political climate of 2017 should not be underestimated.

Carole Roussopoulos’s Le F.H.A.R. (1971) and Susan Mogul’s Feminist Studio Workshop Videoletter (1975) explore how important social and political groups grabbed hold of video tech to capture, chronicle and share their message.

The commission by British artist Heather Phillipson questions the place of countercultures in the 21st century and how the normalisation of video recording has affected the contemporary society.

swipe-right

We are very grateful to GoMA’s current students, Angelo and Dimitra, on their internship as part of the MSc: Modern and Contemporary Art: History, Curating and Criticism at the Univeristy of Edinburgh, for developing their upcoming event: Swipe Right. Swipe Right is part of the GpMA’s Public Programme engaging diverse audiences in the current exhibition programme specifically around two exhibitions Please Turn Us On and Polygraphs

TICKET LINK https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/swipe-right-tickets-32228553471

VENUE & TIME:
4.45 – 7.45pm
Gallery 4

INFORMATION

Swipe Right is a performative and discursive event with engaging talks, illustrated poetry and comedienne Clare Summerskill will be presenting her stand-up and comedy songs. The event opens up a discussion around LGBT+ identity and self-image after the Web 2.0.

The proliferation of online dating applications and social platforms has brought a change in the way people perceive themselves and construct their own image. Specifically, the image of LGBT+ people changed across the years, building an identity over old and new stereotypes that seemed to become gradually different from the 1970s and partially less politically involved. In an open dialogue with the history, culture and political struggle of the gay liberation movement since the 1960s, this event attempts to explore the development of the self-image of the individuals through mainstream and new media (TV, cinema, video, social network, dating applications) as well as through various forms of visual culture (illustrated poetry, visual art, performance) in the last four decades.

Swipe Right with contributions from:

Dr Michael Bachmann, Theatre Studies, University of Glasgow

Dr Lucy Weir, Modern and Contemporary Art, University of Edinburgh

Professor David Kinloch, Poetry and Creative Writing, University of Strathclyde

Clare Summerskill, Comedienne, actress, writer, singer

Programme:

4.45pm-6.30pm Talks and Q&A

7pm – 7.45pm Clare Summerskill performance

Refreshments

disco10

 

On Saturday 10 December 2016 to mark International Human Rights Day 2016 and the end of the UN 16 Days to Eliminate Violence Against Women, GoMA worked with the artist Mandy McIntosh on her work International Human Rights Day Disco.

For International Human Rights day, the Studio at GoMA will become a discotheque, literally a library of records, DJ-ed by Artex Scar AKA Mandy McIntosh, The Mighty Bass Warrior Sound System and Mungos Hi Fi . The aim was to create a social space for listening and dancing. A Tramalfadorean timeline of the human grooves that stir/red us to strike/march/donate/knit/embrace/dance/reject/become.

For Mandy this work came out of the radical roots of disco. “From the direct actions of Swingjugend amd Zazous, who danced to “degenerate” swing jazz in the face of Nazi oppression, to the Rock Against Racism movement of the 70s and 80s, music has always provided a social, structural or lyrical counterpoint to attacks on Human Rights. Records can act as a transmission of political information or reinforcements of unity. They can also illustrate what human beings want to happen within an echoing epoque and transfer to us where we feel most ourselves.” Mandy McIntosh 2016

A massive massive thanks to everyone who brought their joy, kindness and dancing feet and joined us on the afternoon for conversation, listening to the music and dancing til the sun went down. We loved and and are already planning next year’s one!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

Installation shot from Poppies, a collaboration between Max Brand and Joanne Robertson

Installation shot from Poppies, a collaboration between Max Brand and Joanne Robertson

(GoMA) presents the debut collaboration between Max Brand (b. 1982, Leipzig) and Joanne Robertson (b. 1979, Manchester). The exhibition features new painting and sculpture by these exciting, emerging contemporary artists, together with a musical work co-produced in the lead-up to the exhibition’s opening.

The show brings together two international painters, who also work as musicians. Central to the exhibition is Brand and Robertson’s desire to ‘expand’ traditional media. They paint directly onto the wall and floor, as well as displaying huge wall hung canvases, floor sculptures and hanging lights, all accompanied by a sound installation. This approach transforms painting from something restricted within a frame to something resistant to containment. Visitors can expect bright, energetic works that appear to have exploded across the gallery space.

Joanne Robertson has been working in Glasgow having previously studied at the Glasgow School of Art. She is well-known in the city for the important role she has played in its art and music scene for many years. Her work has previously been shown in the city at CCA and Mary Mary gallery. This is the first time Brand’s work has gone on display in Glasgow/ Scotland.

Poppies offers a rich and immersive experience, overlaying the visual elements with a soundtrack specially commissioned to feature in the exhibition. Poppies explores how contemporary art in Glasgow continues to grow and evolve, considering how art transcends different mediums in the same exhibition.

Speaking about the project, curator of contemporary art, Paul Pieroni said: “It’s very exciting to open up GoMA to artists like Max and Jo. As they’re working together for the first time, I expect something fresh and bold to come from them. I think the unpredictability of new collaborations is important. We’re proud to place our faith in these two artists, to give them the space and time to work towards something unique for the museum.”

John Samson '1978 - 1983' installation shot

John Samson ‘1978 – 1983’ installation shot

John Samson: ‘1975–1983’
18 September 2016–17 April 2017

‘1975–1983’ presents the complete works of enigmatic Scottish filmmaker, John Samson (1946–2004). This is the first museum exhibition of the five films Samson made during his lifetime.

A worker on the Clyde shipyards, as a teenager Samson was involved in various protest movements. He was a spokesperson for Glasgow shipyard apprentices and in 1961 was arrested at the Holy Loch for participation in a Committee of 100 anti-nuclear action. In 1963, after meeting his partner Linda, then studying painting at The Glasgow School of Art, Samson fell in with a bohemian circle including artists, writers and musicians. He taught himself guitar, took up photography, and by the mid-70s began the cycle of films featured in this exhibition.

Samson’s working class roots, his passionate interest in radical politics, art and bohemia, compelled him towards individuals and groups operating at the margins of society. Covering topics such as tattooing, amateur railway enthusiasm, clothing fetishism, professional darts and the sex lives of disabled people, Samson’s films are concerned with cultural outsiders. Despite courting controversy, he was always compassionate in his curiosity. Samson’s work is about allowing unusual people to speak for themselves; carefully observing – but not judging – their conspicuous lives.

‘1975–1983’ comprises all five of Samson’s films: Tattoo (1975), Dressing for Pleasure (1977), Britannia (1978), Arrows (1979) and The Skin Horse (1983). It also features a commissioned graphic project by Stockholm-based designers Martin Falck and Alexey Layfurov.

Tattoo (1975) A documentary film based on the art of tattooing, tattoo artists and their clients, with interviews exploring the fascination for, and the reasons behind, choosing to be tattooed. The film builds up to long climactic scene, often since replicated in other films on the subject, featuring tattooed bodies displayed as art objects. Typical of his involvement in his projects, Samson had himself tattooed during the making of the film.

Dressing for Pleasure (1977) explores the subject of fetishism in clothing. The film, which, despite its subject matter, remains playful and light, features cameos from Malcolm McLaren and punk icon Jordan, as well as a host of other curious characters.

Britannia (1978) A group of volunteers work on the restoration of an old locomotive. This unashamedly poetic piece draws strongly on the theme of resurrection as Britannia rises like a phoenix from the ashes of its desolate resting place.

Arrows (1979) is a film about Eric Bristow and the world of competitive darts. In Bristow, already successful and self-assured in his early 20s, Samson finds a compelling figure through which he explores a sport as well as a specific period of British social life and culture.

The Skin Horse (1983) is a ground-breaking a film about sex and disability that won Samson much acclaim. An exploration of body image and identity, The Skin Horse pulls no punches and remains as powerful as ever.

Thanks to Robin and Linda Samson, the Estate of John Samson, Mike Wallington, National Film and Television School, Laurence Myers, Kamila Kuc and Andrew Tullis.

Installation shot of 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot of ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

As we enter the closing weeks of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, it is your last chance to see the exhibition and we are delighted to share details of the remaining public events in our exciting engagement programme.

tom-shakespeare-publication-in-john-samson-1978-83

Wednesday 26th October 2016, 6.30 – 7.45pm GoMA
Jacqueline Donachie in conversation with Professor Tom Shakespeare

This event will examine the role of creative arts in exploring and understanding the challenges that disability and genetics pose to individuals and families.  In particular, the discussion will reference the passage of time that relates to Donachie’s exhibition, and the film Skin Horse (1983), currently in the John Samson exhibition in Gallery 1. Tom Shakespeare recently re-visited eight of the participants in his 1996 book, The Sexual Politics of Disability, who now feel that their disability has become less salient, more akin to the general effects of ageing seen in the wider population. Yet with degenerative conditions, the disability becomes more prominent in the individual’s own biography. Art and social research can both tell these stories, but art captures the imagination and enables reflection, in ways that academic work rarely does.

Tom Shakespeare is professor of disability research at UEA.  He has written extensively on disability rights and bioethics and is author of ‘Disability Rights and Wrongs’ and ‘Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome’ among other books and articles.  He was formerly a member of Arts Council England, and has curated three different science/ art exhibitions around the social and ethical impacts of the life sciences, as well as making work himself.

 

Installation shot of 'Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Installation shot of ‘Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

4 November 2016, Day Symposium
(10am – 4.30pm, Platform. Transport provided from Glasgow city centre).

This day symposium will provide an opportunity to discuss in depth some of the issues raised by Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain.

By taking the theme of expert culture and participation and examining this through a prism of ethics and academic practice, the symposium will look at lived experience as a model for radical practice to challenge social constructs around scientific and medical research, and knowledge exchange.  Can auto-ethnographic and participative art practice increase our understanding of disability and care in the fields of genetics, inherited disability and ageing? What is the role of lived experience within both creative practice and academic research, and how can the effects on participants be assessed, and valued?

Speakers come from a range of academic and artistic backgrounds, and each has been asked to address in some way the effects of their practice on specific communities of interest.

They include Jacqueline Donachie, Karen Guthrie, Jason E Bowman and Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley. The day will be chaired by Alison Stirling, with a narrative commentary provided by Moira Jeffrey.

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain: the symposium has been supported by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, The Marigold Foundation and Glasgow Life.

To book a ticket for the symposium please use this link: The Symposium https://platform-online.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873563814

Information in PDF format here final-events-pdf

%d bloggers like this: