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IMG_3090 2Marlie Mul
This exhibition is cancelled
26 May – 29 October

This would have been Marlie Mul’s first exhibition in Scotland, however after careful consideration the artist has cancelled the exhibition.

There is no exhibition.

Except for large billboard posters that advertised the exhibition’s cancellation, the gallery is empty.

While there is no exhibition, visitors are welcome to continue to use the gallery space. To discuss using Gallery 1 for you own activities please speak to a member of staff on site, or download a proposal form here This exhibition CANCELLED_ Public Proposal Form.

The exhibition is cancelled is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and The Mondriaan Fund.

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swipe-right

We are very grateful to GoMA’s current students, Angelo and Dimitra, on their internship as part of the MSc: Modern and Contemporary Art: History, Curating and Criticism at the Univeristy of Edinburgh, for developing their upcoming event: Swipe Right. Swipe Right is part of the GpMA’s Public Programme engaging diverse audiences in the current exhibition programme specifically around two exhibitions Please Turn Us On and Polygraphs

TICKET LINK https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/swipe-right-tickets-32228553471

VENUE & TIME:
4.45 – 7.45pm
Gallery 4

INFORMATION

Swipe Right is a performative and discursive event with engaging talks, illustrated poetry and comedienne Clare Summerskill will be presenting her stand-up and comedy songs. The event opens up a discussion around LGBT+ identity and self-image after the Web 2.0.

The proliferation of online dating applications and social platforms has brought a change in the way people perceive themselves and construct their own image. Specifically, the image of LGBT+ people changed across the years, building an identity over old and new stereotypes that seemed to become gradually different from the 1970s and partially less politically involved. In an open dialogue with the history, culture and political struggle of the gay liberation movement since the 1960s, this event attempts to explore the development of the self-image of the individuals through mainstream and new media (TV, cinema, video, social network, dating applications) as well as through various forms of visual culture (illustrated poetry, visual art, performance) in the last four decades.

Swipe Right with contributions from:

Dr Michael Bachmann, Theatre Studies, University of Glasgow

Dr Lucy Weir, Modern and Contemporary Art, University of Edinburgh

Professor David Kinloch, Poetry and Creative Writing, University of Strathclyde

Clare Summerskill, Comedienne, actress, writer, singer

Programme:

4.45pm-6.30pm Talks and Q&A

7pm – 7.45pm Clare Summerskill performance

Refreshments

disco10

 

On Saturday 10 December 2016 to mark International Human Rights Day 2016 and the end of the UN 16 Days to Eliminate Violence Against Women, GoMA worked with the artist Mandy McIntosh on her work International Human Rights Day Disco.

For International Human Rights day, the Studio at GoMA will become a discotheque, literally a library of records, DJ-ed by Artex Scar AKA Mandy McIntosh, The Mighty Bass Warrior Sound System and Mungos Hi Fi . The aim was to create a social space for listening and dancing. A Tramalfadorean timeline of the human grooves that stir/red us to strike/march/donate/knit/embrace/dance/reject/become.

For Mandy this work came out of the radical roots of disco. “From the direct actions of Swingjugend amd Zazous, who danced to “degenerate” swing jazz in the face of Nazi oppression, to the Rock Against Racism movement of the 70s and 80s, music has always provided a social, structural or lyrical counterpoint to attacks on Human Rights. Records can act as a transmission of political information or reinforcements of unity. They can also illustrate what human beings want to happen within an echoing epoque and transfer to us where we feel most ourselves.” Mandy McIntosh 2016

A massive massive thanks to everyone who brought their joy, kindness and dancing feet and joined us on the afternoon for conversation, listening to the music and dancing til the sun went down. We loved and and are already planning next year’s one!

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Installation shot of 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot of ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ with the works Deep in the Heart of Your Brain is a Lever, Pose Work for Sisters and Studio 1995, Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

As we enter the closing weeks of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, it is your last chance to see the exhibition and we are delighted to share details of the remaining public events in our exciting engagement programme.

tom-shakespeare-publication-in-john-samson-1978-83

Wednesday 26th October 2016, 6.30 – 7.45pm GoMA
Jacqueline Donachie in conversation with Professor Tom Shakespeare

This event will examine the role of creative arts in exploring and understanding the challenges that disability and genetics pose to individuals and families.  In particular, the discussion will reference the passage of time that relates to Donachie’s exhibition, and the film Skin Horse (1983), currently in the John Samson exhibition in Gallery 1. Tom Shakespeare recently re-visited eight of the participants in his 1996 book, The Sexual Politics of Disability, who now feel that their disability has become less salient, more akin to the general effects of ageing seen in the wider population. Yet with degenerative conditions, the disability becomes more prominent in the individual’s own biography. Art and social research can both tell these stories, but art captures the imagination and enables reflection, in ways that academic work rarely does.

Tom Shakespeare is professor of disability research at UEA.  He has written extensively on disability rights and bioethics and is author of ‘Disability Rights and Wrongs’ and ‘Genetic Politics: from eugenics to genome’ among other books and articles.  He was formerly a member of Arts Council England, and has curated three different science/ art exhibitions around the social and ethical impacts of the life sciences, as well as making work himself.

 

Installation shot of 'Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

Installation shot of ‘Hazel (2016), Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark.

4 November 2016, Day Symposium
(10am – 4.30pm, Platform. Transport provided from Glasgow city centre).

This day symposium will provide an opportunity to discuss in depth some of the issues raised by Donachie’s exhibition Deep in the Heart of Your Brain.

By taking the theme of expert culture and participation and examining this through a prism of ethics and academic practice, the symposium will look at lived experience as a model for radical practice to challenge social constructs around scientific and medical research, and knowledge exchange.  Can auto-ethnographic and participative art practice increase our understanding of disability and care in the fields of genetics, inherited disability and ageing? What is the role of lived experience within both creative practice and academic research, and how can the effects on participants be assessed, and valued?

Speakers come from a range of academic and artistic backgrounds, and each has been asked to address in some way the effects of their practice on specific communities of interest.

They include Jacqueline Donachie, Karen Guthrie, Jason E Bowman and Professor Sarah Cunningham-Burley. The day will be chaired by Alison Stirling, with a narrative commentary provided by Moira Jeffrey.

Deep in the Heart of Your Brain: the symposium has been supported by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award, The Marigold Foundation and Glasgow Life.

To book a ticket for the symposium please use this link: The Symposium https://platform-online.ticketsolve.com/#/shows/873563814

Information in PDF format here final-events-pdf

Ripples_rn03Rosalind Nashashibi
Ripples on the Pond
Thursday 21 April 2016
6 – 7.30 pm

Last night was the final event in the Ripples on the Pond programme before the exhibition closes. It was a beautiful screening programmed by Modern Edinburgh Film School in discussion with Nashashibi and thank you very much to everyone who came along to witness the works in the exhibition. A huge thank you to Rosalind Nashashibi and LUX, London for the chance to screen these works in the exhibition. Thank you also to Luke Collins for his calm and collected work as projectionist on the night, Rob Kennedy for his help with the gallery’s projector and foresight about the spare bulb! and Alex Hetherington for A Poetic Measurement in Ripples on the Pond.

The following is an edit of Alex Hetherington’s introduction.

My communications with Rosalind surrounded siting the works off-site, at the temporary studio and lecture spaces at Tontine House, in Trongate, and a wonderful idea that one of those spaces might be the room where Glasgow City Council once repaired its street lighting. This off-site idea, away from the gallery, away from the principal site of the art school made me interested in paring back the material behaviour of the museum and conduct her talk as a kind of spoken-word performance, through and with a selection of her films including Electrical Gaza (2015), and definitely an expansion on Carlo’s Vision (2011), so eloquently and magically expressed at An Endless Theatre. An Endless Theatre; the convergence of contemporary art and anthropology in observational cinema was a screening event and symposium at the University of Edinburgh programmed by the artist Karen Cunningham and Richard Braxtrom, a lecturer in film and anthropology. Rosalind screened Carlo’s Vision and then spoke about her work. I observed that thinking/speaking thing that I sense I might have, but to a different degree.

I envisaged the screening with Rosalind would be a studio discussion, masterclass and intimate portrait using conversation, film, stills, stopping the projector, moving between projectors, and microphones, and a relaxed sensibility, reproducing the agility of her thinking and talking as she discusses the development of her practice and its place alongside and within moving image histories, its generations and ideas and developments . The project here is part screening, part unfolding of a film essay, A Poetic Measurement,* the sister-collection that brings from the page and into the space of this collection. How Rosalind’s works work with the material in the exhibition, what it expands, voices, layers, changes and disrupts, how her eye becomes a camera. The film programme would have brought films by Nashashibi/Skaer, and discuss how artists might work with film as a medium together, but we decided to focus on three works from her practice. I wanted to also allow film to be seen in the place of drawing and for correlations to be revealed, as part of this year of discussion on film and works on paper, in this short event, and finally with the editions to allow film to return to works on paper, and to allow them to be distributed and remembered through that form.
* Commissioned for GoMA by Affiliate: Rethinking Collections, (a University of Glasgow programme funded by Creative Scotland)

The Screening

The Painter (2013)
An artist is at work in The Painter (2013)—uniformed elegantly in paint-splattered shoes and work-wear—yet another unseen artist is observing, directing, framing off-screen. Nashashibi films more than the work itself, and large, muscular, abstract paintings emerge from a combination of energetic and economic gestures. With unflinching pragmatism, the painter pushes and pours muted viscous matter, surprisingly, with a mop. Eventually, the focus shifts to a drawing of a smiling girl atop a horse—tail raised, issuing a pile of dung. It’s by the painter’s daughter. – See more here

Carlo’s Vision (2011)
“There is a young man, The Shit, and his fiancée, whose name, it seems, is Cinzia. At the start of the Vision these two young people are passing the traffic lights at the intersections of Via Casilina and Via di Torpignattara. Carlo, the one who is watching, observes them coming toward him: in fact, he is in the middle of Via di Torpignattara, on a cart with cork wheels, exactly like a director on a dolly. There is a long, slow backward tracking shot. Pulling the cart . . . are three Gods, whom Carlo, however, sitting on the tailgate, with his back to the shaft, cannot see.”
— Pier Paolo Pasolini, Petrolio.

So reads a passage from Pasolini’s sprawling, epic novel, Petrolio, first published in unfinished form seventeen years after his murder in 1975. Inspired by the film treatment style of this section of the novel, Nashashibi has taken the protagonists, the props and the location, transported them into the present day and used them as the departure point for her 16mm film,Carlo’s Vision. The result is a mixture of observational documentary and fiction, in which Carlo, contemplates the long march of a young man and his fiancée, while being towed backwards by three gods, two speaking and one silent. Although he has his back to them he can hear what they are thinking, as two distinct interior monologues. The two prophetic figures provide an interpretation of what Carlo is witnessing, commenting on the past and present governance of Rome, and focusing on class and sexuality as manipulated today by Italy’s power structures.

Jack Straw’s Castle (2009)
Jack Straw’s Castle – the title is itself a ruse: the film is named for a Hampstead pub, not the UK’s Secretary of State for Justice – is all about the time and space of rehearsal: in both halves of the film, the milieu is male and the rules of the ritual being enacted remain enigmatic to the viewer, whose gaze is both an invasion of privacy and an invitation to perform. (Nashashibi’s own mother appears in the second half of the film, apparently playing the director for whom the whole spectacle is being composed). A theatrical rehearsal, as Shakespeare’s ‘rude mechanicals’ discover, is a curious space and time in which one performs the role of actor and acted – the mask slips, unfinished scenery fails to convince, timings are botched and bathos or obscenity intrudes: ‘I kiss the wall’s hole, not your lips at all.’ The film folds back on itself, suggesting that its verité first half is a carefully erected sham.

As part of Nashashibi’s most expansive solo show to date, in 2009, Jack Straw’s Castle was the more suggestive of two new works concerned with aspects of rehearsal and performance.

Rollcall of Thanks
I had a wonderful talk with Rosalind in her studio at Bluecoat in Liverpool and the structure for the screening came out of that conversation.

I’d also like to thank Katie Bruce, everyone at GoMA, LUX, LUX Scotland, Tina Fiske, Sarah Neely, Richard Taylor, Ainslie Roddick, Francis McKee, Luke Collins, Ben Cook, everyone at GSS, everyone at CCA, especially Kenny Christie, the team at Old Hairdressers, Jenny Brownrigg at GSA, Laura Edbrook and MAP, and the artists Catherine Street, Allison Gibbs, Rosalind Nashashibi, Anne-Marie Copestake, Mairi Lafferty, Annabel Nicholson, Ruth Barker, Karen Cunningham, Sarah Forrest, Lauren Gault and Anne Colvin for hard work, generosity, space and time, insights, wonderful events and total confidence in the project and me; equally to the speakers Iain Morrison, Glyn Davis, Suzanne van der Lingen and Angela McClanahan. Also to artists like Oliver Mezger, Lucy Reynolds and to Richard Taylor for offering up insights into the practice of writing about and speaking about moving image. A special thanks to the audiences who came and came back to the gallery and its events.

Alex Hetherington, April 2015

Rosalind Nashashibi Biography

Rosalind Nashashibi, born 1973 in Croydon, UK, studied at Glasgow School of Art. She has had numerous solo shows including those at Tate Britain; Chisenhale Gallery, London; Presentation House Gallery, Vancouver; ICA London; Bergen Kunsthall; Berkeley Art Museum. She represented Scotland at the 52nd Venice Biennale, and has participated in Manifesta 7, Sharjah 10 and the 5th Berlin Biennial with Lucy Skaer in their collaboration as Nashashibi/Skaer. She presented a solo show at Objectif Exhibitions in Antwerp in 2014 and an Imperial War Museum commission on Gaza in 2015. She lives and works in Liverpool.

Rosalind Nashashibi works with film, sculpture, print and photography. Her films combine close observation of everyday life with dramatically constructed scenes, in order to reveal the friction that occurs between the real and the fantastical or mythological. Her works often explore issues of control, internalized in citizens or exerted by the state.

MAKE YOURSELF

It started with an email conversation between the GSA lecturer Rachael Grew and GoMA about how her Gender and Identity course for 3rd year students at the GSA could connect in with the exhibition Ripples on the Pond. The team here at GoMA offered some ideas and the students met, firstly with Rachael, then with staff at GoMA. The interested students decided to do a workshop and spent time developing their ideas and responses to the works in Gallery 4.

The workshops took place last weekend and thanks to everyone who came along and took part, even the nursery group who turned up on Monday had a go! This weekend we have opened up a space in Gallery 4, currently between installations, for a pop-up exhibition of the collages made last weekend, which have been turned into a sculptural version of ‘consequences’: the game where you add a new body and limbs to the head you choose. It will only be open this weekend so if you took part in the workshop come along and find your work. Also we would love to hear your thoughts tweet or instagram using #MAKEYOURSELF or #GlasgowGoMA.

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From the GSA students:
The Make yourself?! workshop started as an extension of our studies on the Gender and Identity course at Glasgow School of Art. In response to the Ripples on the Pond exhibition at GoMA, we decided to focus on the themes of body and identity that are present in all the works shown. We worked with the medium of collage that invited children and adult participants to explore these deep and important themes in a more engaging and playful manner, allowing them to reimagine their own bodies and identities both individually and collaboratively.

We purposefully limited the amount of “human” collage materials to encourage participants to recreate themselves in an unconventional way, opening up the discussion about the nature of identity.

We invite you to take part in this exploration of identity and body, and interact with the collaborative sculptures exhibited.

Be playful.
Alina, Shareen and Vivienne
Thanks to everyone who took part in the workshops last weekend

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We had a lovely launch last week to celebrate the work done by the brilliant filmmakers as part of the Ripples on the Pond – Artist’s Interviews project. This work is now officially launched and available in Gallery 4 as part of the Ripples on the Pond exhibition. It presents a series of engaging and enlightening short films made by a group of volunteers, from Glasgow Women’s Library (GWL), interviewing artists whose work feature in this exhibition. The project was developed by GoMA and GWL to create an opportunity for women to learn documentary filmmaking skills and contribute to ongoing research of each institution. For the project the group worked with Helen de Main to identify the artists and coordinate the interviews and final films.

During the course of the project the group has received training and support, developing skills and confidence to enable them to produce these films. This has included bespoke tours of the exhibition and the GWL’s archive developing their research skills and knowledge about the artists, as well as hands on film making training covering all aspects of practical production, from cameras to sound to editing. This dynamic group of women has worked together tirelessly, bringing their individual skills and personalities to the project. As first time filmmakers, they have supported each in other in the production of this impressive series of films.

The films provide a fascinating insight into each of the artist’s working practices, told in their own words, and reveal some of the inspiration behind works featured in Ripples on the Pond. They make a valuable contribution to recording and archiving women’s creative practice, a core aim of GWL and this museum’s collection.

The films will be also released on the GWL website between January and April 2016, along with interviews with the filmmakers by a GWL intern Camilla – the first one with Morgan Fraser is online , along with the interview with Helen de Main here.

Ripples on the Pond film’s were created by Mel Bestel, Louisina Currie, Morgan Fraser, Jenny Kelly, Una McBurney, Lucy Stewart and Esme Williams
With special thanks to Lou McLoughlan

We would like to thank all the artists for their generous and thoughtful contributions, Jacqueline Donachie, Helen de Main, Sarah Forrest, Shauna McMullan, Ciara Phillips and Jacki Parry.

Project was supported and funded by Glasgow Life / Glasgow Museums and Glasgow Women’s Library

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