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TASTE!

TASTE!

TASTE

Gallery 2
From 14 July 2017
Henri Cartier-Bresson, Beryl Cook, Fischli/Weiss, Sarah Forrest, Andy Goldsworthy, Douglas Gordon, David Hockney, Eduardo Paolozzi, David Shrigley, Stanley Spencer, Andy Warhol and Lawrence Weiner
TASTE! * is an exhibition of artworks from Glasgow Museums’ collection displayed alongside material from our archive, exploring how collections are built, artworks are commissioned, and exhibitions are organised. Through the display of artwork and archive, TASTE! will present a narrative that unpicks the history of the Gallery of Modern Art’s (GoMA) collecting, shining a light on both the artworks and the processes behind their journey from artist’s studio to museum collection. By hanging artwork and archive together, TASTE! suggests that object and idea are of equal importance and offers the exhibition as a space to enjoy, question and discuss the value of art.

Few things can cause controversy in the way that contemporary art can. From unmade beds to piles of bricks, the objects, processes and concepts behind modern and contemporary art are undoubtedly challenging. Since opening its doors in 1996, GoMA has, like the work its shown, sometimes been a controversial place. Once notorious for not including artists emerging from Glasgow in the early to mid-90s in favour of popular, figurative artworks, much of what has been shown here has divided opinion.  Now GoMA can pride itself on being a forward thinking, progressive collecting institution with one of the strongest and most diverse collections of Contemporary Art in the UK, holding a wide range of works from cutting edge performance art to internationally significant photography and video.

TASTE! aims to show how curators have approached collecting over the last two decades, exploring artists and curators methods, reasoning and influences.
Showing works in a new and experimental context will invoke the spirit in which many artworks were made. Trying new methods of work is key part of both artistic and museological practice and by showing some different combinations of artworks and never before seen objects from the archive**, GoMA is trying something new – attempting to offer a unique insight into contemporary art for both experienced museum goers and first time visitors alike.
Much of the thought processes that take place inside artist’s studios and the offices of the world’s art galleries are completely invisible and alien to many. I think partly because of this it can be a challenge for some visitors when they’re confronted with an unmade bed or pile of bricks and told it’s a work of art. By showing artworks and documents from our archive we hope to offer a greater insight into the how’s and whys of what goes on at GoMA.Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Will Cooper

*With works by 12 artists including Andy Warhol, Beryl Cook, Douglas Gordon, Sarah Forrest and Eduardo Paolozzi, TASTE! will periodically change with rotations taking placing over the coming years.

**This exhibition will, for the first time, place works together to create a snapshot of our collecting history, with some never before seen archive material expanding on GoMA’s rich history.

Installation shot from 'Deep in the Heart of Your Brain' (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

Installation shot from ‘Deep in the Heart of Your Brain’ (2016) Jacqueline Donachie, photo Ruth Clark

This time last year Deep in the Heart of Your Brain* had been open for a couple of weeks and the excellent reviews for the exhibition had started come in. Roll on one year and the artist Jacqueline Donachie, along with the Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh, has won the inaugural Freelands Award and is currently making new work for the exhibition in Edinburgh later this year; Glasgow Museums now has a capsule collection of her works acquired for the City with the support of the National Fund for Acquisitions; over 40,000 visitors attended the exhibition; and 2105 people attended 52 events, talks and workshops as part of the public programme.

The Deep in the Heart of Your Brain symposium** was a significant aspect of the public programme. It was exciting to programme in response to the exhibition and be a part of the amazing discussions that happened that day. We were delighted when Moira Jeffrey agreed to write a response to the symposium and are now even more delighted to be able to publish it online here. Field Notes from the Heart’s Frontier.

GoMA are very grateful to Moira for her wonderfully considered response to the day and her enthusiasm for taking on a very open brief! We would also like to thank Jacqueline Donachie for feedback, Angelo Nese for copy editing and Kirsty McBride for a fantastic job on the design.

*Deep in the Heart of Your Brain, 20 May–13 November 2016, Gallery 4, Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), Glasgow, the symposium and Field Notes from the Heart’s Frontier  were commissioned by Glasgow Museums with support from a Wellcome Trust Arts Award. Jacqueline Donachie also re-ceived support to work with GoMA from the National Lottery through the Creative Scotland Open Project Fund.

**The Deep in the Heart of Your Brain symposium was held at Platform, Glasgow on November 4, 2016, to develop the themes of Jacqueline Donachie’s exhibition of the same name at the Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow. The symposium was co-produced by Katie Bruce and Jacqueline Donachie and chaired by Alison Stirling, Projects Director, Artlink, Edinburgh. Its aims were to bring artists, institutions, academics and interested individuals together to dis-cuss care, bravery, lived experience, autoethnography and expert cultures in relation to the ethics and practice of knowledge exchange/public engagement in the art/medical research field.

The contributions were:
Jacqueline Donachie, Artist. Illuminating Loss
Karen Guthrie, Artist and filmmaker. The Closer We Get
Sarah Cunningham-Burley, Professor of Medical and Family Sociology, Assistant Principal, Research-led learning and Dean of Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences in the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Edinburgh. Making the private public: lived experience of health and illness.
Jason E. Bowman, Artist with a curatorial practice, writer, researcher and educator. MFA: Fine Art Programme Leader at the Valand Academy, University of Gothenburg. Curating as Care Making

IMG_3090 2Marlie Mul
This exhibition is cancelled
26 May – 29 October

This would have been Marlie Mul’s first exhibition in Scotland, however after careful consideration the artist has cancelled the exhibition.

There is no exhibition.

Except for large billboard posters that advertised the exhibition’s cancellation, the gallery is empty.

While there is no exhibition, visitors are welcome to continue to use the gallery space. To discuss using Gallery 1 for you own activities please speak to a member of staff on site, or download a proposal form here This exhibition CANCELLED_ Public Proposal Form.

The exhibition is cancelled is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation and The Mondriaan Fund.

hmf_partner_mono         Logo downloads EN web zwart

image part II rotator

Please Turn Us On Pt II
Gallery 3
8th April – 31st May 2017

Carole Roussopoulos
Heather Phillipson
Stansfield/Hooykaas
Susan Mogul

Please Turn Us On pt II continues the dialogue between early video art and international countercultures. Stansfield/Hooykaas’ What’s It To You (1975) and Heather Phillipson’s You Can Use Your Smartphone (2014) remain from Please Turn Us On pt I and are accompanied by two works exploring video technology’s importance to radical feminist groups in the early 1970s.

What’s It To You? is a pioneering work by artist duo Elsa Stansfield and Madelon Hooykaas. Made in Glasgow, using the Third Eye Centre’s video equipment, What’s It To You? allowed the local community to directly respond to this groundbreaking technology.

Original photographs and archive materials from the project offer insight into artists’ approach to early video. Alongside are two politically engaged and unconventional films whose relevance in the political climate of 2017 should not be underestimated.

Carole Roussopoulos’s Le F.H.A.R. (1971) and Susan Mogul’s Feminist Studio Workshop Videoletter (1975) explore how important social and political groups grabbed hold of video tech to capture, chronicle and share their message.

The commission by British artist Heather Phillipson questions the place of countercultures in the 21st century and how the normalisation of video recording has affected the contemporary society.

swipe-right

We are very grateful to GoMA’s current students, Angelo and Dimitra, on their internship as part of the MSc: Modern and Contemporary Art: History, Curating and Criticism at the Univeristy of Edinburgh, for developing their upcoming event: Swipe Right. Swipe Right is part of the GpMA’s Public Programme engaging diverse audiences in the current exhibition programme specifically around two exhibitions Please Turn Us On and Polygraphs

TICKET LINK https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/swipe-right-tickets-32228553471

VENUE & TIME:
4.45 – 7.45pm
Gallery 4

INFORMATION

Swipe Right is a performative and discursive event with engaging talks, illustrated poetry and comedienne Clare Summerskill will be presenting her stand-up and comedy songs. The event opens up a discussion around LGBT+ identity and self-image after the Web 2.0.

The proliferation of online dating applications and social platforms has brought a change in the way people perceive themselves and construct their own image. Specifically, the image of LGBT+ people changed across the years, building an identity over old and new stereotypes that seemed to become gradually different from the 1970s and partially less politically involved. In an open dialogue with the history, culture and political struggle of the gay liberation movement since the 1960s, this event attempts to explore the development of the self-image of the individuals through mainstream and new media (TV, cinema, video, social network, dating applications) as well as through various forms of visual culture (illustrated poetry, visual art, performance) in the last four decades.

Swipe Right with contributions from:

Dr Michael Bachmann, Theatre Studies, University of Glasgow

Dr Lucy Weir, Modern and Contemporary Art, University of Edinburgh

Professor David Kinloch, Poetry and Creative Writing, University of Strathclyde

Clare Summerskill, Comedienne, actress, writer, singer

Programme:

4.45pm-6.30pm Talks and Q&A

7pm – 7.45pm Clare Summerskill performance

Refreshments

exterior-view

Polygraphs is a group exhibition exploring truth, fiction and evidence in a complicated world. Centred around Abstract (2012), a two-channel video work by Berlin based filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl, gifted to Glasgow Museums’ collection last year, the exhibition is drawn entirely from Glasgow Museums’ collection.

steyerl-installation

Abstract, 2012 Hito Steyerl Two channel HD video with sound 7 minutes, 30 seconds Image CC 4.0 Hito Steyerl Image courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

Artists are often witness to a changing global environment and their role within that culture is to document, ask questions and create layers of meaning to engage audiences with current international discourses. Thus, Abstract provides a frame through which to encounter other artists interested in interrogating dominant historical narratives and our relationships to the arms trade, colonialism, the slave trade and feminism.

Polygraphs reflects GoMA’s long-standing interest in research and evidence based documentary artworks. The exhibition includes works from the last 100 years and poses questions about the relationship of museums to the histories, identities and politics that they represent. By re-displaying older works alongside more recent pieces the exhibition reactivates truths and fictions still relevant today.

cybercrannog

cybercrannog

The resource space and public programme for Polygraphs has been developed in conjunction with graphic designer Neil McGuire and Cyber-Crannog

Note: Abstract was presented by the Contemporary Art Society through the Collections Fund, 2015. It marks the first work by Hito Steyerl to enter a public collection in the UK

ARTISTS: Jane Evelyn Atwood, Muirhead Bone, Boyle Family, Gerard Byrne, Graham Fagen, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Beth Forde, Alasdair Gray, Ian Hamilton Finlay, David Hockney, Wyndham Lewis, Peter Kennard, kennardphillips, Barbara Kruger, Scott Myles, Anthony Schrag and Hito Steyerl

disco10

 

On Saturday 10 December 2016 to mark International Human Rights Day 2016 and the end of the UN 16 Days to Eliminate Violence Against Women, GoMA worked with the artist Mandy McIntosh on her work International Human Rights Day Disco.

For International Human Rights day, the Studio at GoMA will become a discotheque, literally a library of records, DJ-ed by Artex Scar AKA Mandy McIntosh, The Mighty Bass Warrior Sound System and Mungos Hi Fi . The aim was to create a social space for listening and dancing. A Tramalfadorean timeline of the human grooves that stir/red us to strike/march/donate/knit/embrace/dance/reject/become.

For Mandy this work came out of the radical roots of disco. “From the direct actions of Swingjugend amd Zazous, who danced to “degenerate” swing jazz in the face of Nazi oppression, to the Rock Against Racism movement of the 70s and 80s, music has always provided a social, structural or lyrical counterpoint to attacks on Human Rights. Records can act as a transmission of political information or reinforcements of unity. They can also illustrate what human beings want to happen within an echoing epoque and transfer to us where we feel most ourselves.” Mandy McIntosh 2016

A massive massive thanks to everyone who brought their joy, kindness and dancing feet and joined us on the afternoon for conversation, listening to the music and dancing til the sun went down. We loved and and are already planning next year’s one!

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