A Room Full of Stones, 2014 and Bagmotts Halt, 2014 – Anne Colvin, 28 May – 9 July 2015

Anne Colvin, A Room Full of Stones, 2014, courtesy © the artist

Anne Colvin, A Room Full of Stones, 2014, courtesy © the artist

A Room Full of Stones, 2014 and Bagmotts Halt, 2014
Anne Colvin
28 May – 9 July 2015

GoMA are excited to announce that the gallery will be showing two recent works by Anne Colvin, a Scottish artist based in San Francisco who works primarily with the moving image. These works will be shown as part of Ripples on the Pond, an exhibition which has at its core works from the Glasgow Museums’ Collection. The show takes as a starting point recent acquisitions from the Glasgow Women’s Library 21 Revolutions series, relating them to other works in the collection and sparking questions about gender, themes and media choice in relation to women’s practice and visibility.

Ripples on the Pond is also curated as a conversation between the works in the collection on paper and moving image and invited Modern Edinburgh Film School and LUX Scotland to programme artists screenings within and beyond the gallery space.

Themes of play, landscape, feminism, place and visibility emerge and through the exhibition and ongoing conversations we are learning more about the works in the collection and understanding the genealogy of practice, both locally and internationally, of women artists living and working in Glasgow.

A Room Full of Stones, 2014 and Bagmotts Halt, 2014 were selected by the Modern Edinburgh Film School*, as part of the sister essay and programme for Ripples in the Pond, these works act as a poetic response to the themes in the exhibition. Using fragments of film, and often revisiting images within the same film, Colvin explores the sculptural, ephemeral and temporal qualities of the moving image and develops the conversation on visibility, portraiture and practice within the collection essay of Ripples on the Pond.

* The Modern Edinburgh Film School programme and essay was commissioned by Glasgow Museums and the University of Glasgow through funding from Affiliate: Thinking Collections’ (a University of Glasgow programme funded by Creative Scotland)

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