GENERATION – Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon, Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now © Douglas Gordon. Photography credit: Installed for National Galleries of Scotland, 2006. Photography A Reeve

Douglas Gordon, Pretty Much Every Film and Video Work From About 1992 Until Now © Douglas Gordon. Photography credit: Installed for National Galleries of Scotland, 2006. Photography A Reeve

Douglas Gordon
Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now.

27 June – 29 September 2014

Douglas Gordon is one of the most important, internationally known artists to emerge from the Glasgow School of Art in recent decades. He makes videos, films, photographs, sculpture, text and performance works, often referencing supposedly opposing themes such as good/evil, life/death, innocence/guilt and light/dark. Fear and observations of time have also been recurring themes, most notably in his works related to film noir.

This installation for GENERATION is an encyclopaedic condensed retrospective of all the film and video works Gordon has made since 1992, giving us a glimpse, almost, into his mind. 82 works are shown on 101 old televisions, reminiscent of a private video collection viewed at home. Most of these works were originally displayed as large format projections, but here they are all equal.

Key works shown within the installation include 24 Hour Psycho (1993), Between Darkness and Light (After William Blake) (1997) and Play Dead; Real Time (2003).

Douglas Gordon said of this work that he ‘… wanted it to have the feeling of Paddy’s Market circa 1984.’ Paddy’s Market was a historic Glasgow market selling a variety of second-hand goods.

About the artist
Douglas Gordon (born 1966) studied at the Glasgow School of Art from 1984 to 1988 and at the Slade School of Art, London, from 1988 to 1990. He won the Turner Prize in 1996, the Premio 2000 at the 47th Venice Biennale in 1997, the Hugo Boss Prize in 1998 as well as the Central Kunstpreis, Kölnischer Kunstverein.
Most recently, in 2008, he won the Roswitha Haftmann Prize awarded by the Kunsthaus Zurich and he was the recipient of the Käthe Kollwitz Prize in 2012. Gordon teaches at the Städelschule, Frankfurt, Germany, and lives and works in Berlin and Glasgow.

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